How to write a dissertation proposal

Many questions ran through my mind when my department demanded that we all submitted a proposal for our dissertation. Really! What did they mean by the proposal for the dissertation? Isn't it supposed to be a business term or a regular wedding starting point? I guess these same questions are running through your mind right now. It is ok to be tense and ask lots of questions. Majorly, the questions to ask will be: what should I write? How do I start? What is the aim of my tutor?

To answer these questions, I will like to start with what a dissertation proposal is. A dissertation proposal is a logical write-up written solely by the researcher in view and aimed at explaining the topic. Simply put, a write-up is written to introduce your mind and ideas about a topic you want to find answers to. In this short but expository write-up of the researcher, the topic's aim must be well known and explained vividly.

The first thing to note in any write-up is to make sure a thorough study is done. Indeed, you have to pick a topic, but there are varieties of topics that might come your way and seem so attractive. Do not jump into picking anyone. Make sure you do a definitive study and understand what the topic covers. This means you must have answers to a question before you wrote it out in your proposal.

Accepting any topic means you are ready to write your proposal.to begin with, the topic also means you have must have read enough journals, books, and articles written by other researchers. Here come the format and logic of writing a well-structured dissertation format.

  • In academia, the introduction is the first approach to landing good attention from your readers. The best thing to do is to write an introduction that is catchy and speak about the topic expressly. It can even go as far back as comparing what other researchers said about the topic and how you are coming in to give another answer to the topic.
  • The body of your proposal. This is the largest part of your write-up and must include:

1. The purpose of the topic.

2. The method you intend to use to achieve the purpose.

3. Your finding and research were done on the topic.

4. Problems that might reduce your effort.

5. Time factor

6. Moral thoughts.

  • In a few words and a broad summary, bring your proposal to an end.

Here is the magic to having all of the above done without stress. Consult your supervisor regularly. It might sound a little weird, but it is the shortcut to having a great proposal and dissertation write-up. Your supervisor has the power and knowledge to accept your writings or reject it. To play safe here, you should regularly show them your progress and let the corrections be done on time. For example, your supervisor knows how to select a topic that will be suitable for your level of degree.

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